POWr Social Media Icons

Tuesday, 8 November 2011

The New York State Group Homes Situation

I found an awesome commentary on the New York Time’s “Abused and Used” series that I think should be required reading for everyone. I think that you can get the message without having read the articles, but for those who like a bit of backstory: The “Abused and Used” series examines a review that the New York Times did on some previously unreleased data about the mortality rates in New York State group homes for people with intellectual disabilities. The Times found that in the last decade, 1200 deaths have in state and privately-run New York State group homes have been attributed to unnatural or unknown causes – that’s 1 in 6. And that number is the start of a story of abuse reports, poorly-trained workers, lack of safety protocols (and little or no review of safety protocols when a death happens) and little accountability for residents’ safety in New York State group homes that just made me feel sick.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/06/nyregion/at-state-homes-simple-tasks-and-fatal-results.html?_r=2&pagewanted=1

What the New York State Group Homes Situation Tells Us


There’s obviously something in our society that’s still very apathetic toward people with disabilities, or the situation in New York State group homes would not have happened – some governing body would have seen what was happening and snapped to attention long before it got to this point. I like Zoe Wool's take on it (this is the required reading I was talking about earlier):

http://savageminds.org/2011/11/06/valuing-life-death-and-disability-sorting-people-in-the-new-york-times/comment-page-1/#comment-708957

The problem is (and the family of  one the residents who died also said this; see link to article in the first section) is that we don't value people with disabilities in our society. Wool suggests it's because we value people with disabilities relative to what kind of contribution they make (or made), rather than on their inherent personhood, to the point it determines how we speak about them.

Or whether we try to assist them to have a life or,  just try to keep them alive.

That sort of difference shouldn't exist. Everyone with a disability should have access to the resources that they need to not only live safely and with dignity, but to have equal access to the community and opportunities to build the life that they desire that people without disabilities do. We don't need further inequality lines within the disability community itself.

What to Do?


This is why we have to whole-heartedly support efforts by people such as Nicky Clark to stomp out disability hate speech. Because when you can call people with disabilities disgusting names, it’s not that much further to believing it’s okay to do things like slack off on those boring, inconvenient little things that you have to do in your job to keep them safe (like make sure food is cut up small enough so they won’t choke and then actually stick around to see that they don’t choke while they’re eating; see link to article in the first section), and just a bit further to justifying withholding food. I don't know how people get to the point where they physically and/or sexually abuse residents, but apparently plenty of both was going on as well, rarely reported to police, and dealt with internally by moving the abusing staff to another home where they would abuse again.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/13/nyregion/13homes.html?pagewanted=1

And I don’t know why people like this even want to work in group homes, or how they get past the interview process, but obviously in the New York State group homes a whole lot of them did…and now we’re seeing what happens when they get shuffled from house to house instead of fired and when the system doesn’t have enough safeguards to make sure the damage they do doesn’t happen again.

It makes me wonder how many other states this sort of thing is happening in... :(

Archive of the "Abused and Used" series about New York State group homes:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/nyregion/abused-and-used-series-page.html?src=tp

2 comments:

  1. Sarah, I remember back in the mid 80's here in Sydney, they hoicked everyone out of the institutions and set up group homes. It was totally chaotic, with people, who were incapable of taking care of themselves, wandering the streets . I know some of those people had never lived outside the "hospital" and had no independent living skills. Many were very frightened and overwhelmed with the changes. It was a very difficult time.

    I don't know why people without compassion choose to work in a "caring" position. Is it a power or a control thing?

    ReplyDelete