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Thursday, 16 February 2012

What Now, Rosie O'Donnell?

So, I've been keeping an eye on reaction to Rosie O'Donnell's interview with Chelsea Handler over the last couple of days.

Disappointing, to Say the Least. Rosie O'Donnell's Taken a Beating Over This.


People have been saying some very nasty things about Rosie O'Donnell (and to her, if her Twitter feed is anything to go by). I was shocked by the venom of some of the comments that I heard had appeared on Matt Roloff's (of The Learning Channel's "Little People, Big World") Facebook page, but when I investigated tonight it looked as if those comments had been removed. The remaining ones, calling Rosie O'Donnell things like "loudmouth" and "ignorant" and accusing her of planning the whole piece as a way to get the Roloffs on her show (in response to call from Matt Roloff for compassionately helping Rosie O'Donnell to move past her anxieties about little people) were difficult enough to read.

I don't think that Rosie O'Donnell is blameless here. I think that she didn't choose the most sensitive way to express what she was trying to say, and I understand why people are angry. But, as a person who is "different", I have always said that I'd rather that people express the ways in which my disabilities make them anxious, if this is an issue, and ask me whatever questions that they need to in order to alleviate their anxiety. I'm not going to fault her for doing that, especially when it obviously does make her feel ashamed that she feels that way.

Rosie O'Donnell...Meet Me at Camera Three


I've been reading your Twitter feed and see how frustrated you're getting at apologizing over and over and not being sure what else you can do. I think, if I was a little person, what I'd want to hear now is what you plan to do now that you've admitted to the world that you suffer from this anxiety.

I think that you can understand this. You only have to imagine a conversation between two people where one described how she'd grown up in a house where she was taught that same-sex attraction was something to be fears and that was lesbians made her anxious, even though it made her ashamed to feel that way; how she couldn't understand how lesbians had sex; how she couldn't wrap her mind around the idea of two women being attracted to each other, couldn't reconcile that with her conceptions of healthy relationships...and I'm sure you'd not only wholeheartedly suggest that if he or she really want to get over this anxiety, there are resources that he or she can access to have questions answered, and that she should try to find some lesbians in loving relationships with whom she can spend some time and get to know, so that she can see that they're not that much different than everyone else: people with jobs and children and good times and bad times that contribute to their communities and live in loving relationships...just with other women.

And I'm sure that you'd know to suggest that if the anxiety has reached the stage where it's very disruptive to her life, maybe professional help is warranted. Phobia treatments are very effective and actually work quite quickly when the individual is really committed to them.

Of course, you don't owe anyone details about what you plan to do now, if anything. But you keep asking on your Twitter feed, "I've apologized...what more can I do?" Maybe sharing that you plan to do something will heal some wounds.

For the Rest of Us


Enough of the attacking rhetoric and the name-calling. You don't create a more inclusive world by calling *anyone* names, no matter how intolerant you think they're being. It really just brings you down to the level at which that you believe they are.

Don't make me say it again.

Matt Roloff's Facebook Page:  http://www.facebook.com/RealMattRoloff

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