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Sunday, 25 March 2012

I Don't Need Easy - Julianna Russell

I love working with teenagers. Granted, sometimes their behaviour sometimes frustrate the hell out of me, but we need to remember that even in the healthiest of teenagers, their brains don't fully develop until their mid-twenties. It makes the achievements of teens like Julianna Russell stand out even more.

Julianna is another person whose achievements need celebrating this International Developmental Disabilities Month. Born with spina bifida, at age 16 she discovered that she didn't have enough feeling in her legs to operate the pedals in a car. However, determined to get her driver's license, she researched her options on the Internet. After taking an adapted driving course and having her car outfitted with hand controls, she was able to get her license.

She also started her own website, I Don't Need Easy, to share with other youth with disabilities how she did it and to give them a place to network and share other experiences of growing up with disabilities.

http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2012/03/25/1983570/teen-creates-website-to-help-other.html

Relating to Julianna Russell


When I read Julianna Russell's story, I thought she was wonderfully brave.

I got my driver's license at 16 without any problem. But after my brain surgery, I started having seizures. The surgery left some scar tissue that just sent my brain into spasms. The first little while they were large seizures that came on with little warning (although I could usually say within a couple of days that one was coming on) and caused me to lose consciousness. Gradually, as my doctors fine-tuned my medications, the seizures became rarer and rarer - but I'd be awake through them as they happened. Eventually they became tremors my arm or leg so small that no one but me knew that anything was happening. It was at that point that my neurologist declared that I could start thinking about driving again, and wrote a letter to the Ministry of Transportation for me.

But by that point I'd been over a decade without a license. It was a terrible drain on my independence, yes. My town had no public transportation. I had to rely on taxis and the good nature of others to get anywhere outside of town. Having no license put me out of the running for most jobs in social services in the area. But I sat on the letter and the opportunity to start getting my license back...for far too long...and I'm not really sure why.

I knew I'd have to start all over again after such a long period without driving, but that didn't *really* bother me. Something else was holding me back and, like I said, I'm not sure what it was. I have the first stage of my license now, though, and will be able to take my full driver's test in February 2012.

But I can relate to wanting the independence of being able to drive oneself around, instead of relying on other people. Kudos to Julianna Russell for finding a way to get her license and for using her talent and abilities to share with others how she did it! I actually used her site to investigate adaptations to car steering wheels.

I Don't Need Easy


Julianna Russell's website is here: http://hstrial-dischallenges.homestead.com/index.html

It's obviously just getting started, and hopefully she'll get some more people post some stories. But for people (not just necessarily teens) with disabilities that want to drive and the people that are going to be helping them, it's a good place to start getting information. Great job, Julianna Russell! Keep it up!

2 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for helping me get the word out! I would love to post your story on my site. Please send me your story. Thanks again for helping!

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  2. Hi Julianna...it was a pleasure to cover your story, and I would honoured to be included on your site. I will send you something this weekend. :)

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