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Tuesday, 21 October 2014

My Brain AVM: Taking My Meds

October is Talk About Your Medications Month, and I've been thinking about medications...and being one-handed...and a bunch of stuff...

I took an anti-depressant on and-off through my pre-stroke life, but nothing else consistently or long-term. Now I feel like I keep a pharmacy in the house - I take two anti-seizure medications, morning and night, an anti-depressant at night, and Ritalin in the morning (plus vitamins, etc.)  Sometimes my pharmacy remembers to put my meds in bottles that I can open easily, but more often they're in bottles with child-proof tops.

I tried to find a YouTube video of some actually opening a child-proof pill bottle with one hand. I could only find one, and the person in it actually looks like they do it differently than I do. I grasp the bottle so it's firmly in my hand, but so that my fingers are at the top to twist it, use my thumb and fingers the push the cap (and the bottle) down hard on a surface (I usually use my leg, but you could use a table) and then, still pushing down, turn the cap to open the bottle.

It's easier to show you this, of course. The next time I have a visitor, I'll get them to film me doing it, because after 14 years of doing this, it's difficult to even explain how to do it.

Long Live the Blister Pack!


There are (arguably) easier ways to handle this, of course. You've likely seen Blister Packs, the cards with the ampules into which medicine is already poured, ready for you to punch out and take at the appropriate time. These are actually great, because they can allow people who otherwise might have trouble pouring their own meds to take them independently. An intellectually disabled person who might have had to live in group home or have had a staff person come in to a place where they otherwise live independently to administer medications each day can know by pictures on the card (like a sun, a moon, or a bed) which ampule to punch out when, and have that control.

Why don't I use a Blister Pack? It's never been recommended, and I've never felt the burning desire to ask, I guess. But I should remember to ask for meds in non-child-proof containers, because sometimes I get lazy and don't put them on properly, and I have a cat that likes to knock pill bottles off counters when she wants attention. Neither of my cats have any interest in the contents of said pill bottles, luckily.

The other advantage of a Blister Pack is that you just have to look at to it know whether or not you've taken your meds. That sounds funny, because you'd think that you'd know...but these things get to be automatic, and when you live on your own and there's no one around to confirm whether you did or not when you can't remember because you've been on auto-pilot, it's nice to know.

Random Stuff


Sometimes doctors ask whether my meds make me sleepy, because the anti-seizure meds tend to do that, and the dose for one of them is quite high. I can't answer that anymore. I've always been sleepy, and I've forgotten whether it was different before the pills. Some days it feels like the past fourteen years have been a lifetime, and that I've forgotten what it was like before.

When I first started working, sometimes I'd get doing something and forget to take my morning meds (which is okay for me to do every now and then, but definitely not a good habit to get into!) Now I set an alarm on my cell phone to remind me when I need to take them, because I'm kind of disorganized!

What are some tricks that you use to manage your medications? What about medication management is challenging for you?

1 comment:

  1. Oh, those are great tricks! I used those long boxes where the pills are separated by the day of the week. Then, I didn't have to open multiple bottles each morning. But all my pills were in the morning. If you had to take pills at different times of day, you might need to relabel the box, but it could still work.

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