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Tuesday, 7 April 2015

My AVM Story: Working "Out There", Working on Balance

It took a couple of years after my brain surgery and stroke, but eventually I was well enough to work.

It's always been part-time. Work in the educational and developmental services sector is always part-time and contract when you're just breaking into it these days, and in the area in which I live, work in general is usually part-time and/or seasonal. Most people work a couple of jobs to make ends meet.

Until recently, it's been rare for me to find more than one job at a time that I can actually do, given my disabilities and the restrictions that they impose on me, although with freelancing there have certainly been times where I've worked the equivalent of full-time. But a writing job in my apartment and a desk job "out there" don't necessarily require the same amount of energy from me, as I've recently discovered.

Since September, I've been working at a local computer centre, created especially for people who want to do online learning. It's part of a government program, and a good one. There's a small fine arts community college in my community, but anyone who's wanted to pursue post-secondary education in just about anything else has had to take the big, expensive step of moving to a larger centre and attending school there, or commuting at least 2.5 hours round trip per day. With the increasing number of programs offered totally or almost totally online at Canadian universities and community colleges, the Contact North program allows people in rural communities like mine to get assistance choosing a program, get signed up, and to have a place with fast internet access to do their work if they need it.

Most weeks it's not a whole lot of hours. But some weeks it has has been. And recently there's been the welcome addition of a writing/research job with a small media production company in my town, for two or three days a week. I some of that work from home, but I like going into the office at least one day a week. My last two jobs haven't been office jobs. I miss that environment.

I come home at night and catch up on with my freelancing, and often fall asleep at the computer as I'm working. I do a lot of catch-up on weekends.

I hear people who have had strokes talk about how they're much more tired than they were before, and I remember when that was really the case for me. But now I tend to think, "That's not me anymore" and I push myself pretty hard sometimes when, really, I don't know how much of my brain is still damaged, and to what extent, and how it affects me.

I can see the effects of some of it, of course. But I don't know if even my doctors can say for sure  what all of the effects of the stroke were.

Everyone has to find a way to balance work and other aspects of life, and to figure out how to stay healthy and to schedule time for everything that they want and need to do. I'm grateful to be able to work and to have a lot of work right now, but I'm sorry that it's not leaving me a lot of time and energy to write. I'm working on that. I'd like to be here more.

I've never been very good at the life balance thing. I'm trying to learn!

1 comment:

  1. e-lifeinprogress.blogspot.com8 April 2015 at 11:59

    Hi Sarah,
    Nice post, and something a lot of us struggle with. I actually collapsed from exhaustion before learning to pace myself a bit better. The only advice I can offer is to pay attention to what your body is telling you and go from there. Cheers and you can find me online at fulltiltwheelie.blogspot.com.

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